Taken 12-Dec-13
Visitors 23


7 of 99 photos
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Categories & Keywords

Category:Architecture and Structures
Subcategory:Bridges
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Historic landmarks, Hudson Valley, Pamela Phelps, Pine Singer Images, Rifton NY, Rosendale NY, Ulster County, bridges, covered bridges, historic sites, landmarks, perrines covered bridge, scenic
Photo Info

Dimensions5188 x 3891
Original file size8.21 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spacesRGB
Date taken12-Dec-13 14:00
Date modified14-Dec-13 07:09
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeSONY
Camera modelDSC-H200
Focal length4 mm
Focal length (35mm)22 mm
Max lens aperturef/3.1
Exposure1/320 at f/9.7
FlashNot fired
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 80
Metering modeMulti-spot
Perrines Covered Bridge

Perrines Covered Bridge

Perrine's Bridge was originally built by Benjamin Wood in 1844, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as of April 13, 1973.

The oldest, and one of the most renowned historic sites in Esopus, Perrine’s Bridge spans the Walkill River between the Town of Esopus and the Town of Rosendale. It was built for the Kingston to New Paltz Road. This covered bridge is a single span of 138 feet in length and is of the Burr Arch Truss design. It is the only Burr Arch left in New York State.


Perrine's Bridge derives its name from James Perrine, a French Huguenot immigrant who built a tavern near the site of that future bridge in 1820. The bridge which was commissioned in 1834, connected Esopus to Tillson in the Hurley Patent. Perrine's son was hired each winter as the "snower." He would spread snow the length of the structure so horse-drawn sleighs could cross.


The old covered bridge served for 100 years with few repairs needed other than flooring. During the 1930's some shoring was needed under the floor beams. A gradual deterioration brought on a final closing in 1946.

In the early 1960's, a number of local residents formed the Perrine's Bridge Committee believing that the covered bridge was a piece of Esopus heritage worthy of preservation. The committee raised money for its preservation. A great deal of grassroots support went into the effort. The restoration of the bridge was completed early in 1969 and rededicated on June 29th of that year.

This image is now available for prints, canvas prints, framed prints, and greeting cards on my site at Fine Art America OR
ImageKind OR RedBubble
Photographed Between Rifton and Rosendale New York, USA. Composed in Photoshop with layers, adjustments, filters, and original textures.